Reflect on one’s own beliefs and values as they relate to professional

Reflect on one’s own beliefs and values as they relate to professional

Reflect on one’s own beliefs and values as they relate to professional 150 150 Nyagu

School of Nursing

RN to BSN Program — Spring 2021

Oakland (O421/A421) San Mateo(M421) and Sacramento (S421)

GENED 490 Humanities and the Human Condition

Table of Contents

Contact Information/ Course Dates……………………………………………………………………… 2

Description & Course Learning Outcomes…………………………………………………………… 2

Caritas Processes…………………………………………………………………………………………….. 3

Course Alignment with University & Professional Standards…………………………………… 3

Required Learning Resources……………………………………………………………………………. 4

Recommended Learning Resources…………………………………………………………………… 4

Teaching/Learning Strategies……………………………………………………………………………… 4

Grading……………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 4

Course Topics………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 5

Evaluation Methods……………………………………………………………………………………………. 5

Paper ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 5

Course Project………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 5

In-class Participation…………………………………………………………………………………………. 5

Online Discussions…………………………………………………………………………………………… 6

Evaluation of Online Discussions………………………………………………………………………… 7

Reflection…………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 7

Program Policies………………………………………………………………………………………………. 7

University Policies……………………………………………………………………………………………… 10

Course # and Title GENED 490 Humanities and the Human Condition
Credits 2 Semester Credits
F2F/ Online 30 hours class time; 60 hours asynchronous = 90 hours total
Prerequisites Admission to the RN-BSN program
Faculty Alice Vestergaard: EdD, MBA, MA, MS, MCHES (Sacramento and San Mateo)
Nancy Symons: M.Div, M.A. (Oakland)

Office Hours By appointment
Email Alice Vestergaard avestergaard@samuelmerritt.edu
Nancy Symons nsymons@samuelmerritt.edu

Phone Email preferred
Class Days & Times Oakland Cohort: classes meet Tuesdays 4:30pm – 6:20 pm.
January 12, 26; Feb 9, 23; March 9, 23

Sacramento Cohort: classes meet Wednesdays from 5:00 pm- 6:50 pm.

Jan 13, 27; Feb 10, 24; March 10, 24

San Mateo Cohort: classes meet Thursdays

from 3:00 pm- 4:50 pm.

Jan 14, 28; Feb 11, 25; March 11, 25

DESCRIPTION

This course explores how life, especially birth, suffering, caring, and death are shaped in art— primarily novels, films, and plays. Historical and cultural roles of caring for the sick and caring for souls are considered. Scholars will discuss how art and the humanities help people understand themselves and their worlds. Scholars will explore films and works of art that may arouse a wide spectrum of emotional responses and challenge personal values and beliefs about people, behaviors, and situations. This is a blended course with required face-to-face and online components.

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES
Identify ways in which artistic expressions of personhood and relationship help us understand and appreciate the human
Discuss ideas of a ‘good life’ and a ‘good death’ as portrayed in selected
Articulate the moral and ethical implications of various behaviors in selected works of
Identify the sympathies and antipathies that arise in response to works of
Cultivate openness to seeing situations in new ways through respectful listening and beginners mind
Articulate a personal vision of caring informed by the responses and values evoked by works of

CARITAS PROCESSES™ FOR TERM 5
*Tend to basic human needs

* Open to mystery and unknowns

COURSE ALIGNMENT WITH UNIVERSITY & PROFESSIONAL STANDARDS
SMU Institution Learning Outcomes (ILOs)

Enter practice, enter residency education, or practice in the enhanced role for which they have been
Embody their ethical and professional responsibilities to effectively serve individuals from diverse backgrounds, their profession, and society with compassion, caring and humility.
Communicate and collaborate effectively as members of interprofessional
Integrate an understanding of structural and social determinants of health into professional
Provide person-centered care using sound clinical reasoning informed by evidence from research and
Advocate, as agents of change, to improve health and healthcare, especially for structurally vulnerable
Effectively use data, information, and technology to support decision-making in complex systems.
Engage in self-care practices for personal health and wellness

RN to BSN Program Learning Outcomes (PLOs)

Demonstrate respect for the inherent dignity of individuals and groups in the delivery of nursing care within an appropriate moral, ethical and legal
Integrate theory, research, and knowledge from using, the physical, the behavioral sciences, and humanities to improve the quality of care provided to
Using transformative principles of unitary caring science, develop self and others to enhance the interprofessional nursing role in teams and organizations.
Articulate a philosophy of self-care and professional development.

AACN Baccalaureate Essentials

1-6 Engage in ethical reasoning and actions to provide leadership in promoting advocacy, collaboration, and social justice as a socially responsible citizen.

1-8 Demonstrate tolerance for the ambiguity and unpredictability of the world and its effect on the healthcare system.

2-6 Promote factors that create a culture of safety and caring.

Reflect on one’s own beliefs and values as they relate to professional
Identify personal, professional, and environmental risks that impact personal and professional choices and behaviors
8-14 Recognize the relationship between personal health, self-renewal, and the ability to deliver sustained quality care

Quality and Safety Education in Nursing (QSEN)
Integrate knowledge of psychological, spiritual, social, developmental, and physiological models of pain and suffering (M-K

REQUIRED BOOKS & LEARNING MATERIALS
Required Textbook: William, A. L. (2019). Integrating Health Humanities, Social Science, and Clinical Care. Routledge. IBSN 978-1-138-30999-9

Films: You do not need to purchase the required film. You should plan ahead to stream or rent it from whatever film service you normally use.

Gou, A. (Producer) & Wang, L. (Writer & Director). (2019). The Farewell [Motion Picture]. A24.

(Streaming on Amazon, or Netflix)

Plays: (Posted in Canvas – no purchase necessary)
Barta, B. (1995). Journey into that good night. In A. H. Hawkins & J. O. Ballard (Eds.), Time to go: Three plays on death and dying. Philadelphia, PA: University of Pennsylvania Press.

See learning resource pages on Canvas for other works.

RECOMMENDED LEARNING MATERIALS

Bernstein, P. (2008). Courage to heal. San Diego, CA: Sunbelt Publications.

A novel about Dr. Sidney Garfield.

De Kruif, P. (1943). Kaiser wakes the doctors. New York, NY: Harcourt, Brace and company.

Some write this is “more propaganda than sociology or qualified medical study” see http://jama.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=267128

Debley, T., & Stewart, J. (2009). The story of Dr. Sidney R. Garfield: The visionary who turned sick care into health care. Oakland, CA: The Permanente Press

Lopez, R. (2016). Goodnight, maybe forever. [and] The human cost. In Good people. New York, NY: Bellevue Literary Press.

TEACHING/LEARNING STRATEGIES
This course employs a variety of approaches to instruction including lecture, classroom discussions, and online discussions. Success in the course depends primarily on effective preparation and participation in classroom and in online discussions.

GRADING
All RN to BSN scholars must achieve a minimum cumulative grade equaled to a 2.0 Value, 74%, or a “C” to pass a theory course.

RN to BSN Program Grading Scale
94 -100% A 90 – 93% A- 87 – 89% B+ 84 – 86% B
80 – 83% B- 77 – 79% C+ 74 – 76% C 70 – 73% C-
67 – 69% D+ 64 – 66% D 60 – 63% D- <60% F
COURSE TOPICS
Personhood and relationship in the arts
The good life and the bad life in the humanities
Art and moral-ethical reflection
Art and self-knowledge
Artistic depictions of care

EVALUATION METHODS
CLOS Assignments Grade %
Paper
1-6 The Farewell Reflective Paper 10%
Project
1-6 Humanities Integration Project 20%
Online Discussions
1, 5 Why Humanities #1

65%

1,2,5 Patient Story Discussion Post
1, 5 Philosophies of Interdependence and Mutuality
1, 5 The Influence of Time on Meaning
1,2,5 Bearing Witness to Suffering
1,2,3,4 Carmina Burana Dance
1,2,3,4,5 Resilience and Ethical Practice: A Call to Action
1,2,4,5 Strength, Resilience, Joy
1,5 Arts and the Mind
1,5 Why Humanities #2
1-6 Humanities Integration Project Review and Reflections
REFECTION
1-6 Final Course Reflection 5%
Total 100%

ASSIGNMENT DESCRIPTIONS

Paper Scholars write an 800 to 1000-word paper in response to viewing a film that presents how one family deals with the terminal diagnosis of a key family member. Several themes of the course are presented during the film.

Course Project

The Humanities Integration Project provides an opportunity for scholars to demonstrate an

understanding and synthesis of course topics and content in an applied fashion – in which scholars create a piece (in the medium of their choice) representing the human condition and caring as they have come to understand it through the course textbook reading, online and in class discussions. Scholars are asked to cite works from course readings in support of the project process

In-class or WebEx Participation
Learning how to interpret works from the humanities is greatly enhanced by active interaction. We learn in part through critical thinking, articulating our ideas as clearly as possible, listening to how others respond to the course materials, and responding to what they say and write.

Sharing what we are thinking and feeling in response to works of art opens up new possibilities for understanding the human condition. Learning to see through the eyes of others promotes “shared inquiry” means learning together. Open and honest participation make “shared inquiry” and seeing through the eyes of others possible and enhance the collective learning process.

Online Discussions

The purpose of the online discussion is to create a forum where everyone participates. Face to face interaction is great for spontaneous sharing of ideas. Online discussions are often better for the considered, thoughtful construction of ideas. Reading and responding to the posts of peer enhances shared inquiry and collective learning.

Evaluation of online discussion1
Outstanding, appropriately creative, an example for future students
Posts and responses demonstrates unusually sharp insight into the material, address multiple sides of issues, and could be put on reserve for others to review and emulate. Writing is logical, clear, and organized. Ideas are integrated with appropriate progression and transitions between them. Specific references are made to and expand on the assigned, recommended, and other readings.

Above average; goes beyond requirements
Posts and responses demonstrate good comprehension and understanding of the material and clearly accomplish more than the minimum requirements. Assertions are carefully supported using course readings. The writing style is clear and organization is readily apparent.

Average work for undergraduate student
Posts and responses demonstrate satisfactory comprehension of and engagement with the subject matter. Writing is clear. Contributions at this level generally rely more heavily on synopsis and less on synthesis and analysis. Assertions may not be supported by argument or citations.

Below average/ poor work for undergraduate students
F Unacceptable quality or quantity; violations of academic integrity

Some characteristics of effective participation in online discussions.
Posts and responses are relevant to the discussion and are offered to increase general understanding rather than regurgitate
Responses reflect an understanding and consideration of the ideas offered by others and are not isolated and disjointed and reflect not only excellent preparation but good “listening,” interpretative, and integrative skills, as
Posts and responses show evidence of a thorough reading and analysis of the readings. A sincere attempt at in-depth engagement with the assigned materials is expected every week.
Posts and responses distinguish among different kinds of data— that is: facts, opinions, assumptions, inferences, and
Posts and responses reflect a willingness to test new ideas rather than offer only cautious or “safe”
Posts and responses are respectful but demonstrate a willingness to interact with class members by asking questions or challenging
1Adapted from Jordan-Marsh, M. & Saulo, M. (1996). NURS 516 Syllabus, Los Angeles: University of Southern California. Modified by Professors Gwin, MacIntyre, Rowland

Reflection

The purpose of the final reflection is to provide an opportunity for scholars to explore connections/ insights/discoveries between the course content and discernment of their own personal views of caring within the context of artistic expressions of personhood, and inter-relationships between care provider and patient and the greater human condition.

RN to BSN PROGRAM POLICIES

ATTENDANCE

Punctuality and attendance for the entire class session are expected for both scholar success and group cohesion. Please arrive at least 10 minutes before the start of class.

UNPLANNED STUDENT ABSENCES
Unplanned student absences should be authorized when the student has a short-term serious and compelling medical condition or when a death or serious illness in the immediate family (i.e., parent spouse, sibling or child) prevents attending class. The student is responsible for contacting the instructor as soon as possible after the missed class period and for providing official documentation (e.g., obituary, funeral program) of the reason for the absence upon returning to class. In the event the student’s unplanned absence is authorized and makeup work is allowed, missed papers, presentations, tests and/or homework assignments should be made up as soon as practicable. Students with extensive absences should recognize the consequences of missed class on both their learning and grade.

When a student is absent for an extended period, a viable make-up plan may not be feasible. In these circumstances, other options such as an assigned grade of an “incomplete,” dropping the class or withdrawing from the University may be appropriate.

Faculty have the obligation to limit both class activities/assignments and official University sponsored activities that require a student to miss other classes. Student absences for University sponsored events (e.g. attendance at a regional or national conference) should be authorized only when (1) the event is sponsored by the University; (2) the student represents the University at the event; and (3) the student provides written documentation of points one and two to the instructor at least two weeks prior to the event. In anticipation of authorized absences due to University-sponsored activities, students may submit their assignments to the instructor, following the assignment guidelines, prior to the absence. This includes papers, presentations tests, and/or homework assignments (adapted from Fresno State University).

MAKE-UP WORK POLICY
Faculty policies on attendance and make-up work must be clearly stated on the course syllabus and consistently applied. Faculty should make reasonable accommodation for authorized student absences. Faculty are expected to allow make-up work for authorized student absences, provided there is not an unreasonable number of authorized absences during the semester and provided make-up work can be accomplished without substantial additional cost in time or resources to the academic department or the instructor. It must be recognized that not all learning activities and exercises during class times and laboratory times can be replicated; in such cases, students are at risk when they are absent. When a student is absent on a repeated basis and/or for an extended time period, a viable make-up plan may not be feasible (see paragraph three above).

ABSENCE DUE TO MILITARY SERVICE
All students are entitled to leaves of absence from their studies in order to engage in military service as is authorized by federal law without loss of status. Faculty shall work with the student to find a reasonable accommodation for such absences. Students engaging in military service are required to give notice of such service in advance in writing to the instructor for each of their classes, either in person or through an appropriate officer of the uniformed service in which the service will be performed, except in extraordinary circumstances. No advance notice is required if the giving of such notice is precluded by military necessity (as per regulations prescribed by the Secretary of Defense). Faculty at their discretion may require homework, presentations, reports, papers, and projects to be turned in ahead of or after the missed classes and examinations to be taken before or after the planned or unplanned military absence.

The decision to grant access to materials from missed lectures lies with the faculty who sets the attendance policy for the course and has the authority to determine the circumstances under which accommodations for absences are permitted (adapted from Oklahoma State University).

CANVAS (ACCESSING ONLINE CONTENT)
Scholars are expected to access Canvas every few days. Contact Canvas support if assistance is needed to resolve technical issues (888-233-7764). Inform the instructor in writing of unresolved issues well before assignments are due. To receive important announcements from faculty, subscribe to automatic notifications in Canvas during the first week of the course.

SMU makes many Canvas resources available to you.

Canvas provides 24/7 live support, by telephone (888-233-7764) and online chat.
Canvas publishes excellent FAQs, both as articles in the Canvas Student Guide, and as videos on the Canvas Video Guide.
Here is a short Canvas Student Orientation Video, with information on computer requirements for using

If you have tried these resources and still need 1:1 help, phone the SMU Service Desk directly at 510-907-2555 or use the SMU Service Desk web page to submit an online help ticket.

COMPLAINT, DISPUTE RESOLUTION, AND GRIEVANCE POLICY
The University definitions of complaint, dispute, and grievance can be found by searching these terms in the University Catalog.

DISPUTE RESOLUTION PROCESS—RN to BSN PROGRAM
Suggestions for Success
First, work directly with the person
After class is not a good time to initiate difficult conversations as many faculty members are getting ready to teach another class. Scholars also need a break between classes. Ask the faculty member about meeting or scheduling a time to talk on the phone or via email.
Remember that professional communication is an expectation of all parties. Venting and social media rants are not part of professional
The following steps are recommended for initial communication of issues in the RN to BSN Program. This is considered the “informal” part of the process. Most issues can be resolved informally.

First Step—Write SBAR
Write an SBAR within 48 hours of the precipitating event. An SBAR does the following:

Presents issue in organized framework
Includes relevant context
Separates the assessment from the other steps
Specifies the “ask”
Helps keep the issue primary and the emotional impact secondary
Second Step—Email SBAR
Email the SBAR to the faculty member and ask if they have time to discuss over the phone or in person before class.

Third Step—Dialogue
Allow a sufficient amount of time for dialogue. This often requires 2-3 weeks. as you and your faculty members have full time jobs in addition to school. Understand that some policy issues cannot be addressed by the faculty member. If course or program policy comes up during your conversation, the lead faculty may need to be involved.

Fourth Step—Decisions/ Program Director
Decisions about grades rest with the faculty. Disputes about grades that do not result in failing the course should only be escalated to the program director when the scholar believes the faculty acted in an arbitrary or discriminatory manner. For other issues not resolved after serious communication with the faculty, email the original SBAR along with related email discussion threads to the program director. Again, this step can take a few weeks, especially if the program director needs to take a policy to the fulltime faculty for consideration. If needed, see the University Catalog for the formal resolution process.

DUE DATES & LATE WORK
Except for “tickets to class,” all assignments are due Sundays at 11:59 pm.

Late quizzes, discussion posts, and discussion responses receive zero
The highest grade possible for other late assignments (papers, projects, etc.) is 75%. Late assignments must be submitted within 1 week of their due date
Timely submission of assignments ensures that faculty will have sufficient time to evaluate student work. Submit assignments early to avoid

ELECTRONIC DEVICES
Scholars may use electronic devices during class sessions except when instructed not to do so. Off-topic use of electronic devices disrupts the learning environment.

EMAIL
It is essential to check your SMU email several times each week.
Please do not use your personal email to communicate with faculty or
Please do not use Canvas messaging in assignments or in courses. Faculty do not check those

SAMUEL MERRITT UNIVERSITY POLICIES

Withdrawal Policy

After the end of the drop/add period, a student may withdraw from a course without academic penalty until the midpoint of the course, or when no more than 50 percent of the course has been completed, whichever occurs last. For spring term 2021, that date is February 22, 2021 for the RN to BSN Program. A student may withdraw from a single course only once. The course remains on the student transcript with a grade of “W”. Petitions to withdraw from a course beyond this period would be approved only for serious and compelling reasons such as serious accident or illness. The approval of the instructor and the department chair are required on the petition form, which the student files in the Registrar’s Office. If the petition is granted, the course remains on the student record with a “W” grade. If the petition is denied or the student fails to complete course requirements without formally withdrawing, the grade will be determined by the instructor based on the grading policy and requirements as noted in the course syllabus (See Withdrawal from the University and Refund Policies).

Academic Integrity

Samuel Merritt University affirms the belief that integrity, truth, respect, and honesty are the foundations for our interactions as an academic institution. All students are expected to abide by the policies of academic honesty and integrity as outlined in the catalogue/student handbook. Please note that the Code of Ethics is published in the Samuel Merritt University Catalog:https://www.samuelmerritt.edu/student-catalog-and-handbook. Since dishonesty in any form harms the individual, other people, the community, and the University, policies on academic integrity will be strictly enforced. We expect you to be familiar with the guidelines for behavior, to follow them, and to know the consequences of violating these standards of ethical behavior.

As noted in the Student Handbook/University Catalog, faculty reserve the right to deal with individual instances of academic dishonesty by imposing sanctions such as failure on a paper or project or even failure of the course.

Disability Resource Center

Samuel Merritt University recognizes disability as an aspect of diversity that is integral to society and to the campus community. It is the policy and practice of Samuel Merritt University to create inclusive learning environments. The Disability Resource Center (DRC) works with students and faculty to create accommodations when necessary to provide equal access to University services and facilities. If you would like to discuss disability-related needs, please contact the DRC for a confidential appointment at drc@samuelmerritt.edu. Accommodations cannot be applied retroactively, so please reach out early.

Title IX Statement

Title IX makes it clear that violence and harassment based on sex and gender is a Civil Rights offense subject to the same kinds of accountability and the same kinds of support applied to offenses against other protected categories such as race, national origin, etc. If you or someone you know has been harassed or assaulted, you can find the appropriate resources here: https://www.samuelmerritt.edu/discover/student-experience/safety-and-security/sexual-assault-and-violence-prevention-resources.

Recording of Learning Activities

Audio recordings of class lectures are permitted in this course, with advance notice to the instructor. Recordings should not be posted online or otherwise disseminated outside the class. Recording small group or one-on-one conversations should not take place without the agreement of all parties being recorded. Recordings should be destroyed after the course is completed.

Course Evaluation

Students have the opportunity to provide feedback to the instructor during the course. All students are expected to fill out an anonymous course evaluation at the end of each course term.