Psy 1012 Chapter 13 Assignment

Psy 1012 Chapter 13 Assignment

Psy 1012 Chapter 13 Assignment 150 150 Peter

Psy 1012 Chapter 13 Assignment

Part A

Susan, a college student, is anxious whenever she must speak. Her anxiety motivates her to prepare meticulously and rehearse material again and again. Is Susan’s reaction normal, or does she have an anxiety disorder? Explain two (2) criteria you used in arriving at your answer.

Part B

In recent years, several best-selling books have argued that most emotional problems can be traced to an unhappy or traumatic childhood (an abusive or dysfunctional family, “toxic” parents, and suppression of the “inner child”). What are two (2) possible benefits of focusing on childhood as the time when emotional problems originate, and what are two (2) possible drawbacks?

Part C

Suppose a member of your family has become increasingly depressed in recent months, and it’s apparent that the person needs treatment. You’re chosen to look into the options and to make decisions about the treatment. Based on information in Chapter 16, how might you proceed? Provide two (2) supporting facts to justify your plan of action.

Sample Paper

Part A

Susan, a college student, is anxious whenever she must speak. Her anxiety motivates her to prepare meticulously and rehearse material again and again. Is Susan’s reaction normal, or does she have an anxiety disorder? Explain two (2) criteria you used in arriving at your answer.

Susan’s reaction is perfectly normal. She does not have a psychological disorder. Being anxious is almost normal when being involved in public speaking. Preparing herself before she speaks helps in decreasing her anxiety. The difference between normal everyday disorder and an anxiety disorder is that a disorder is out of your control. Anxiety is a normal reaction to stress. In addition, it helps motivate one to accomplish goals and can also be a warning when someone is in a dangerous situation. However, an anxiety disorder, involves intense and excessive anxiety, along with other debilitating symptoms. Two criteria that helped me in determining that Susan’s reaction is normal are the length of time Susan has her symptoms and how much it affects her on a day to day basis. Susan’s anxiety is short lived and does not interfere with her life dramatically. If Susan was suffering with an anxiety disorder, it would dramatically impact her life.

Part B
In recent years, several best-selling books have argued that most emotional problems can be traced to an unhappy or traumatic childhood (an abusive or dysfunctional family, “toxic” parents, and suppression of the “inner child”). What are two (2) possible benefits of focusing on childhood as the time when emotional problems originate, and what are two (2) possible drawbacks?

Focusing on childhood as the time when emotional problems originate help to address children’s emotional reaction in advance before the effects escalate. When the problem is identified at an early stage, the child can be given the necessary help needed at an early stage when the child is able to quickly adapt to change. Most problems originate from childhood traumas that would help pinpoint the causes of most emotional problems.

Focusing on childhood as the time when problems originate would also help the person suffering to refocus their thoughts from the now to the past. We have no power to change the past, but we can control the present. Research shows that those who write about their past traumas heal faster from illnesses, visit their doctor less often and have stronger immune system. ‘Set aside some time, and write letters to everyone who ever hurt you,’ suggests Dr. Bloomefield. Thinking of the past can help solve their emotional problems that they are suffering with and make them better individuals.

One drawback of focusing on childhood as the time when a problem originated is ignoring current issues and problems or recent trauma that are not associated with childhood. The problem may have not resulted from the individual’s childhood and so the psychologist will not be helping that individual if the main reason so the problem is not identified. Secondly, focusing on childhood as the time when a problem originated allows the individual as placing blame on something that happened in their childhood. So instead of the problem being solved, that individual will keep blaming his or her childhood for the problems being experienced and will not see the importance of fixing the problems.

Part C
Suppose a member of your family has become increasingly depressed in recent months, and it’s apparent that the person needs treatment. You’re chosen to look into the options and to make decisions about the treatment. Based on information in Chapter 16, how might you proceed? Provide two (2) supporting facts to justify your plan of action.

Depression is a common and serious medical illness that negatively affects how you feel, how you think and how you act. Fortunately, it is treatable. Depression symptoms must last at least two weeks for a diagnosis of depression. Depression symptoms may include:

a) Feeling sad or having a depressed mood.
b) Loss of interest or pleasure in activities once enjoyed.
c) Changes in appetite.
d) Trouble sleeping or sleeping too much
e) Feeling worthless or guilty
f) Thoughts of death or suicide

Before a diagnosis or treatment, a health professional should conduct a thorough diagnostic evaluation. The evaluation is to identify specific symptoms, medical and family history, cultural and environmental factors.

Brain chemistry may contribute to an individual’s depression and may factor into their treatment. For this reason, I will advise that an antidepressant is used to help modify the individual’s brain chemistry. Antidepressants are not sedatives and generally have no stimulating effect on people not experiencing depression. Antidepressants may produce some improvement within the first week or two of use. After a few weeks, if there is no improvement I can ask that the dose of the medication be added or substituted with another depressant.

Electroconvulsive Therapy (ECT) is a medical treatment most commonly used for patients with severe major depression who have not responded to other treatments. Therefore, if the antidepressant does not work then the Electroconvulsive Therapy (ECT) is another option. It involves a brief electrical stimulation of the brain while the patient is under anesthesia. A patient will typically receive treatment two to three times a week for a total of six to twelve treatments. EC T is usually managed by a team of trained medical professionals including a psychiatrist, an anesthesiologist and a nurse or physician assistant.

References

Wade, C., Tavris, C., Swinkels, A.M., (2009) Psychology. Toronto: Pearson Prentice Hall.

Smith, D.D., & Tyler, N.C. (2010). Introduction to special education: making a difference. Boston, MA: Pearson/Allyn & Bacon

Make Peace With Your Past. (n.d.). Retrieved November 27, 2017, from https://www.prevention.com/mind-body/emotional-health/recover-unhappy-childhood