Identify a problem within a selected organization that needs to be dealt with.

Identify a problem within a selected organization that needs to be dealt with.

Identify a problem within a selected organization that needs to be dealt with. 150 150 Nyagu

Research Literacy for Health Practice Essay
Research Literacy for Health Practice Essay

This assignment aims to identify a problem within a selected organization that needs to be dealt with. It will find evidence-based information that is relevant to the best practice. It will also report what enablers and barriers make the implementation of the best practice easy or difficult by the selected organization. The organization that has been selected is Galambila Aboriginal Health Service, which provides services of community controlled health and holistic primary health, and associated care services for the Aboriginal communities.Research Literacy for Health Practice Essay

Identification of Problem the Organization Needs to Deal
Through survey and feedback, it has been identified that the local Aboriginals in this area are addicted to smoking. They are suffering from tobacco-related health conditions and the numbers are increasing in comparison to the Non- Indigenous populations (Hodyl et al., 2014). The expecting mothers of the Aboriginal populations smoke more during their period of pregnancy as compared to the other mothers (Cosh et al., 2013). The individuals belonging to this population start to smoke at a very young age. They make fewer attempts for quitting the habit of smoking as compared to the non- Indigenous Australians (Cosh et al., 2013). In the year 2003, in this population, tobacco smoking was responsible for 13.2 % of the total burden of disease and one-fourth of deaths in the Indigenous Australians (Hodyl et al., 2014). The recent high level of tobacco smoking adds considerably to the reduced life expectancy that the Indigenous Australians and it has placed a greater burden of disease on this population (Walker et al., 2015). There have been cases of deaths due to the addiction of smoking. In the year 2008, 49% of Aboriginals and Torres Strait Islander individuals having the ages of 16 years and above were smokers on a daily basis. The high rate of smoking is one of the causes regarding the death of Indigenous infants around six times due to an unexpected death in comparison to the non-Indigenous infants. The ill effect of elevated smoking rates in this population leads to the development of several diseases such as lung cancer, coronary artery disease and stroke (Gould et al., 2014).

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Evidence- Based Information Found
According to Gould, Bittoun, & Clarke, (2016), 2008, 45% of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander individuals having the ages of 16 years and over where every day smokers, 25% were ex-smokers and (36%) did not smoked. Somewhere around 2002 and 2008, the extent of existing day-by-day smokers diminished from 49% to 45% — speaking to the main measurably huge decrease in rates of smoking rates within the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander populace because the ABS Indigenous Household Survey Program started in the year 1994 (Gould et al., 2013). Comparable extents of people (46%) and females (43%) were present day-by-day smokers in 2008. While rates of smoking were least among individuals matured 55 years and more than (32%), they had the most elevated rate of ex-smokers of all age’s bunch (35%). Generally, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander individuals residing in distant ranges will probably be present every day smokers than those living in non-remote regions (49% contrasted and 43%) (Gould et al., 2014). About 66% (62%) of current day-by-day smokers had attempted to stop or diminish their smoking in the 12 months preceding meeting (Passey & Sanson-Fisher, 2015). The most widely recognized purposes behind attempting to stop/diminish smoking were general wellbeing, expense and support from family and companions. Smoking was connected with poorer wellbeing results for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander individuals in 2008 (Gould et al., 2014). Current day by day smokers reported lower rates of astounding/great wellbeing (38%) and higher rates of reasonable/weakness (26%) than the individuals who had never smoked (53% and 16% separately). In like manner, current day-by-day smokers will probably have encountered high/elevated amounts of mental pain in the most recent month contrasted and individuals who had never smoked (37% contrasted and 23%) (Hodyl et al., 2014).Research Literacy for Health Practice Essay

Enablers or Barrier in Practice
The following should be considered for making the best practice easy by the organization:

Ensuring a well-funded and culturally suitable public health program, which addresses the risk factors of smoking- The public health program will assist in addressing those factors of risk that are associated with smoking and reducing the number of diseases and cases of death that are associated with the habit of smoking (Cosh et al., 2013).
Supporting, growing and increasing the capacity and capability of the health workforce of Aboriginal for targeting the risk factors- The health workforce needs to be supported and its capacity and capability should be increased for the effective implementation of the practices that are associated with to minimize the rate of smoking in the Indigenous populations (Gould, Bittoun & Clarke, 2015).
Encouraging healthy lifestyles through the methods of intervention and providing practicing for nicotine pharmacotherapy- The indigenous populations should be encouraged to employ a healthy lifestyle by utilizing the methods of intervention and they should practice nicotine pharmacotherapy for getting rid of the habit of smoking.
Supporting to improve the nutritional status of the Aboriginals- A strategy that addresses the nutritional requirements of the indigenous populations (Gould et al., 2014).
Building capacity and enhancing community control within other communities and organizations (Cosh et al., 2013).
Making adequate and constant funding available for developing programs that are sustainable and are of long-term (Cosh et al., 2013).
Understanding the societal background in which Indigenous individuals live and ensuring that is recognized in the programs that focuses on the family as well as the community (Walker et al., 2015).
Conclusion
In the end, it can be concluded that by implementing all the steps, the organization (Galambila Aboriginal Health Service) can decrease the smoking rate among the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander individuals, particularly in the expecting mothers. This issue needs to be addressed rapidly by gaining support from all the individuals of the community. The organisation should enhance the capacity and ability of the professionals who will be given the task of implementing the program for minimizing the rate of smoking in the Indigenous populations.Research Literacy for Health Practice Essay

References
Cosh, S., Maksimovic, L., Ettridge, K., Copley, D., & Bowden, J. A. (2013). Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander utilisation of the Quitline service for smoking cessation in South Australia. Australian journal of primary health,19(2), 113-118.

Gould, G. S., Bittoun, R., & Clarke, M. J. (2015). A pragmatic guide for smoking cessation counselling and the initiation of nicotine replacement therapy for pregnant Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander smokers. Journal of Smoking Cessation, 10(02), 96-105.

Gould, G. S., Bittoun, R., & Clarke, M. J. (2016). Guidance for culturally competent approaches to smoking cessation for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander pregnant women. Nicotine & Tobacco Research, 18(1), 104-105.

Gould, G. S., Munn, J., Watters, T., McEwen, A., & Clough, A. R. (2013). Knowledge and views about maternal tobacco smoking and barriers for cessation in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders: a systematic review and meta-ethnography. Nicotine & Tobacco Research, 15(5), 863-874.

Gould, G. S., Watt, K., McEwen, A., Cadet-James, Y., & Clough, A. R. (2014). Validation of risk assessment scales and predictors of intentions to quit smoking in Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples: a cross-sectional survey protocol. BMJ open, 4(6), e004887. Research Literacy for Health Practice Essay