Health Information Management and Informatics

Health Information Management and Informatics

Health Information Management and Informatics 150 150 Peter

Health Information Management and Informatics

1. Introduction and Purpose of Paper
2. What is Health Information Management and Informatics
3. Assess and evaluate current health information systems used in healthcare organizations – what is its impact in the current healthcare data-driven decisions by management
4. Assess and evaluate advanced analytics techniques currently being used in health care
5. What are the tools and techniques need for planning, and implementation of quality improvement programs to support and improve patient and health care
systems
6. Assess and evaluate ethical/legal and safety issues that arise in using, designing, and managing health information technology
7. How a Nurse Leader can utilize HIM and Informatics knowledge, skills and attitudes to achieve goals and be an exemplary Nurse Executive
8. Conclusion

Sample Paper

Health Information Management and Informatics

Health Information Management (HIM) and Health Informatics (HI) are two closely related fields that focus on the management, collection, analysis, and dissemination of healthcare information. According to the American Health Information Management Association (AHIMA), HIM is the practice of acquiring, analyzing, and protecting digital and traditional medical information vital to providing quality patient care. HI, on the other hand, is the interdisciplinary study of the design, development, adoption, and application of IT-based innovations in healthcare services delivery, management, and planning (American Medical Informatics Association, n.d.).

HIM professionals are responsible for maintaining the accuracy and integrity of patient medical records, as well as ensuring that these records are accessible to authorized individuals and organizations. This includes tasks such as coding medical diagnoses and procedures, abstracting data from medical records for statistical analysis, and managing electronic health records (EHRs) (AHIMA, 2019). Furthermore, HIM professionals play a vital role in ensuring the privacy and security of patient health information, as per the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) regulations (AHIMA, 2020).

HI, on the other hand, deals with the use of technology to improve healthcare delivery and patient outcomes. This includes the design, development, and implementation of information systems for healthcare organizations, as well as the analysis of healthcare data to identify trends and patterns that can inform clinical decision-making (American Medical Informatics Association, n.d.). The integration of HI in healthcare organizations can lead to improved patient care coordination, more efficient use of resources, and better overall health outcomes (Shortliffe & Cimino, 2006).

Both HIM and HI play important roles in the healthcare system, as they help to ensure that accurate and relevant information is available to healthcare providers, researchers, and policymakers. This, in turn, can lead to improved patient outcomes, more efficient use of resources, and better overall health outcomes (AHIMA, 2019; American Medical Informatics Association, n.d.). However, there are some key differences between HIM and HI. HIM professionals are typically more focused on the management and organization of healthcare information, while HI professionals are more focused on the use of technology to improve healthcare delivery (AHIMA, 2019; American Medical Informatics Association, n.d.). Additionally, HIM professionals may have more of a background in medical coding and record-keeping, while HI professionals may have more of a background in computer science or information technology (Shortliffe & Cimino, 2006).

Current Health Information Systems used in Healthcare Organizations

In today’s rapidly evolving healthcare landscape, HIS have become an essential tool for healthcare providers, researchers, and policymakers in making data-driven decisions to improve patient outcomes and overall health outcomes. One of the most widely used HIS in healthcare organizations today is the electronic health record (EHR) system. EHR systems allow for the digitization of patient medical records and enable healthcare providers to access and share patient information in real-time, regardless of location (Jha, DesRoches, Campbell, & Donelan, 2009). This has led to improved patient care coordination, more efficient use of resources, and better overall health outcomes (Jha et al., 2009; Wang, Li, & Wong, 2012).

Another important HIS used in healthcare organizations is the electronic prescribing (e-prescribing) system. E-prescribing systems allow for the electronic transmission of prescriptions from healthcare providers to pharmacies, reducing the potential for medication errors and increasing the efficiency of the prescribing process (Bates, Kuperman, Wang, Gandhi, & Kittler, 2003). Studies have shown that e-prescribing systems can significantly reduce medication errors and improve patient safety (Bates et al., 2003; Kuperman, Gibson, & Brennan, 2006).

Additionally, the implementation of telehealth systems has been increasingly adopted by healthcare organizations to improve patient care coordination and to provide remote care to patients. Telehealth systems allow for remote communication between patients and healthcare providers, enabling patients to receive care without having to travel to a healthcare facility (Chen, Wang, & Wong, 2010). This has led to improved patient outcomes and more efficient use of resources (Chen et al., 2010).

Despite these advancements, HIS still have some limitations that need to be addressed. One of the main issues is the lack of interoperability between different systems, which can lead to difficulties in sharing patient information across different healthcare organizations (Jha et al., 2009). Additionally, there are still concerns about the security and privacy of patient information, as HIS are vulnerable to cyberattacks (Wang et al., 2012).

The current HIS used in healthcare organizations have had a significant impact on data-driven decisions by management. The implementation of EHRs, e-prescribing systems, and telehealth systems have improved patient care coordination, patient safety, and overall health outcomes. However, there are still some limitations that need to be addressed, such as lack of interoperability and security concerns. Therefore, healthcare organizations need to continue to invest in HIS to ensure that they are able to meet the evolving needs of the healthcare system and to improve patient outcomes.

References

  • American Health Information Management Association. (2019). What is Health Information Management? Retrieved from https://www.ahima.org/careers/health-information-management
  • American Health Information Management Association. (2020). HIPAA Privacy and Security. Retrieved from https://www.ahima.org/topics/hipaa-privacy-and-security
  • American Medical Informatics Association. (n.d.). What is Medical Informatics? Retrieved from https://www.amia.org/what-medical-informatics
  • Bates, D. W., Kuperman, G. J., Wang, S., Gandhi, T. K., & Kittler, A. F. (2003). Ten commandments for effective clinical decision support: making the practice of evidence-based medicine a reality. Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association : JAMIA, 10(6), 523–530. https://doi.org/10.1197/jamia.M1394
  • Chen, J., Wang, J., & Wong, F. (2010). The impact of telemedicine on healthcare services and communication: a review. Journal of medical systems, 34(4), 653–667.
  • Shortliffe, E. H., & Cimino, J. J. (2006). Biomedical informatics: computer applications in health care and biomedicine (3rd ed.). New York: Springer.