Food Collection And Analysis

Food Collection And Analysis

Food Collection And Analysis 150 150 Peter

Food Collection And Analysis

Assignment Table: Part 1: Data Collection

Identity of food item 1:
1. Where was the food item produced?
2. Approximately how far would the food item have to travel to get to your city/town?
3. Would this be considered a local food based on the reading (Local foods are ones that are sourced from within 100 miles)?
4. If the answer to number 3 was no, is there an alternative that you could use as a substitute that is local?
5. List a minimum of four energy inputs that humans must provide to grow, package/prepare, and transport your food item from where it was produced to the store.

 

Identity of food item 1:
1. Where was the food item produced?
2. Approximately how far would the food item have to travel to get to your city/town?
3. Would this be considered a local food based on the reading (Local foods are ones that are sourced from within 100 miles)?
4. If the answer to number 3 was no, is there an alternative that you could use as a substitute that is local?
5. List a minimum of four energy inputs that humans must provide to grow, package/prepare, and transport your food item from where it was produced to the store.

 

Sample Paper

For a world whose reserves are progressively being depleted and where the proliferation of malnutrition-related illnesses is growing, figuring a lifestyle and consumption that encourages Human and ecological safety is crucial. We have to be confident and innovative, and also partner together to fully reconsider food consumption. We must appreciate the growers and assist them perform their activities in a way that favors the natural environment; cherish the fresh produce and be informed on where it is grown, its effects on our organs; and lastly respect our culinary tradition, sharing excellent food with individuals we associate with.

We all know our dietary system’s effect on the environment is nuanced. Numerous influences, such as type of farming, where crops are produced, what chemicals and fertilizers have been used, what our cattle consumes, impact the ecosystem. Even though we are doing a very good at increasing agricultural production to nourish our today’s fast-growing populace, we do so primarily considering the damages our activities may cause. Air and water contamination, biodiversity degradation as well as the natural ecosystem’s both stem from food processing. Ramping up production capacity also increases land utilization. It is also a tremendous drain on some other assets including minerals, property, water, and power. How about the changing climate? About one-third of gas emissions arise from agricultural production; from fossil energy scorched to operate farm machinery and equipment. This pollutants stack up: researchers say that food processing across the globe contributes up to thirty of all greenhouse emissions added to the biosphere annually. And as such our agricultural industry must play a prominent part in combating climate change. And yet not only does the issue involve agricultural production, it is also quite susceptible to its negative impacts.

For a world whose reserves are progressively being depleted and where the proliferation of malnutrition-related illnesses is growing, figuring a lifestyle and consumption that encourages Human and ecological safety is crucial. We have to be confident and innovative, and also partner together to fully reconsider food consumption. We must appreciate the growers and assist them perform their activities in a way that favors the natural environment; cherish the fresh produce and be informed on where it is grown, its effects on our organs; and lastly respect our culinary tradition, sharing excellent food with individuals we associate with.

We all know our dietary system ‘s effect on the environment is nuanced. Numerous influences, such as type of farming, where crops are produced, what chemicals and fertilizers have been used, what our cattle consumes, impact the ecosystem. Even though we are doing a very good at increasing agricultural production to nourish our today’s fast-growing populace, we do so primarily considering the damages our activities may cause. Air and water contamination, biodiversity degradation as well as the natural ecosystem’s both stem from food processing. Ramping up production capacity also increases land utilization. , food processing contributes to climate change, soil depletion, acid rain, and ecosystems deterioration. It is also a tremendous drain on some other assets including minerals, property, water, and power. What of the changing climate? About one-third of gas emissions arise from
agricultural production; from fossil energy scorched to operate farm machinery and equipment.