Economics meets Public Health

Economics meets Public Health

Economics meets Public Health 150 150 Peter

Economics meets Public Health

Suppose you are designing an intervention to increase daily physical activity among adults. Describe how you would draw on concepts from behavioral economics to design the intervention.

Sample Paper

Economics Meets Public Health

Daily physical activity in adults is established to help stop and manage non-communicable conditions like stroke, heart disease, and diabetes (WHO, 2020). It similarly helps stop hypertension, sustain healthy body weight, and may enhance mental health, life quality, and wellness. To increase daily physical activity among adults, healthcare providers have to implement and design interventions, and in the process, they have to draw on concepts from behavioral economics. Behavioral economics combines the components of psychology and economics to understand how and why individuals behave in the way they do in the actual world (Vlaev et al., 2019). The contributions behavioral economics has done to understanding the decisions related to health and healthcare counting physical activity for adults is great. This paper seeks to discuss how to draw on concepts from behavioral economics to design an intervention to increase everyday physical activity among adults.

How to Draw On the Concepts from Behavioral Economics to Design an Intervention

                               To Increase Everyday Physical Activity among Adults

The first way I would draw on concepts from behavioral economics to design intervention could be by making a convincing argument that behavioral economics provides itself well to the economics of healthcare. This is a domain where the clients often and again lack or have trouble understanding information in the face of the myriad of serious choices, where the wrong decision may have huge adverse consequences, and where individual’s decisions at times don’t appear to be in their long-run best interest. Secondly, I would apply the principle of 80/20. 80/20 means focusing on a bigger picture of what’s trying to be captured and figuring out which 20 percent of concepts would bring 80 percent of benefits (Team, 2021). To use this, I would look at concepts drawn as a whole and then find the minimum bare bones required to know to grasp them.

Thirdly, I would connect the existing knowledge. This is because relating new concepts to the existing knowledge is among the best practices for drawing certain concepts for interventions, as in this case. This would involve taking behavioral economics concepts and finding a way to attach them to current subject knowledge. Similarly, to draw on concepts from behavioral economics, I would learn my own way. Different modes of drawing concepts from a particular topic are common. All individuals draw concepts differently, and they all have desired inputs that usually help soak up these concepts faster. In this way, it’s good to find out the method that best suits and prioritize them. Besides, I would note down the key concepts (Team, 2021). Writing down these concepts uses different parts of the brain to draw them. Thus, I would note down anything I think of during the day concerning the topic and maybe use a note app on the phone. With this, my brain will get familiar with processing, and I’ll quickly draw and reveal the elements of concepts that don’t and do make sense.

                                                        Conclusion

Daily physical activity in adults is established to help stop and manage non-communicable conditions like stroke, heart disease, and diabetes. To increase daily physical activity among adults, healthcare providers have to implement and design interventions, and in the process, they have to draw on concepts from behavioral economics. Behavioral economics combines the components of psychology and economics to comprehend how and why individuals behave in the way they do in the real world. Numerous ways, as revealed, can be applied to draw on concepts from behavioral economics, for instance, by making a convincing argument that behavioral economics provides itself well to the economics of healthcare. Another way can be through applying the principle of 80/20, which means focusing on a bigger picture of what’s trying to be captured and figuring out which 20 percent of concepts would bring 80 percent of benefits.

References

Team. (2021, March 2). Eight powerful tricks that make you grasp new concepts faster. Reckon Blog. https://www.reckon.com/reckon-blog/8-powerful-tricks-make-grasp-new-concepts-faster/

Vlaev, I., King, D., Darzi, A., & Dolan, P. (2019). Changing health behaviors using financial incentives: a review from behavioral economics. BMC public health19(1), 1-9. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12889-019-7407-8

WHO. (2020, November 26). Physical activity. WHO | World Health Organization. https://www.who.int/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/physical-activity