Describe the landscape features of your study area.

Describe the landscape features of your study area.

Describe the landscape features of your study area. 150 150 Nyagu

Ecosystem Study – Online Lab Activity Objectives You will: • record biotic and abiotic factors in a terrestrial ecosystem • infer the interactions between biotic and abiotic factors in the ecosystem Directions Individually complete the following activity. Be sure to complete all parts of the activity and answer all questions. You may type your answers directly on this document. You must submit your completed document to the turn in link on Blackboard. Part I: Background Information – Read the following information and answer the question. Ecology is the study of organisms and the environments in which they live. In an investigation of an environment, several levels of organization must be considered. Individual organisms form populations (groups of organisms of the same species with a common gene pool), communities (different populations living in the same area), and ecosystems (communities along with their physical environments). The nonliving, physical features of an ecosystem, such as temperature or water, are the abiotic components, and all of the living organisms in the ecosystem are the biotic components. Ecosystems consist of both biotic and abiotic factors. Most communities are complex and the relationships between the members are interwoven in food webs. Food webs show energy flow in an ecosystem. The arrows show the direction of energy flow in the food web. An organism’s position in the food web determines its trophic level. • • • Producers are autotrophs and are able to convert light energy to chemical energy in the form of sugar. Consumers are organisms that consume producers or other consumers. A primary consumer is a herbivore and consumes plants. Secondary consumers are carnivores and consume other consumers. It should be noted that the diet of consumers often varies. Secondary consumers, such as a fox for instance, will consume primary consumers like mice or voles, but also supplement their diet with plants such as berries. Decomposers, such as soil bacteria and fungi, derive energy from dead and decaying organisms. They are on the side of the food web because they can decompose any living thing from the food web. SP21 Communities often experience competition for resources. Organisms require space, water, and food. If there is a limited supply of these resources, then the organisms will fight over them. Some organisms will have traits that make them better able to survive in their environment. These traits are known as adaptations. An example of an adaptation in plants is having sharp leaves. This prevents herbivores from eating them. An example of an adaptation in animals is camouflage. Camouflage allows organisms to blend in with their environment, which will help them survive. All ecosystems are susceptible to the effects of pollution. A pollutant can be described as any physical, chemical or biological agent that decreases the health of an ecosystem. Examples of pollutants are noise, runoff chemicals, heat and radiation. Any pollutant introduced to a system is passed up the trophic levels and is distributed throughout that ecosystem. Nitrates and phosphates are ions necessary for plant growth and metabolism. In normal amounts, these ions are useful to producers such as algae and plants, who absorb them from water or soil to conduct photosynthesis and cellular respiration. However, when nitrates and phosphates are introduced into an ecosystem in high amounts, through the runoff of landscape and agricultural fertilizers and industrial wastes, it can upset the natural balance of ecosystems and cause harm to one or more trophic levels. Question: 1. Use the information in the Organism & Food Source(s) table below to complete the food web. Fill in the names of the organisms that match the boxes of the food web in the table below. Organism Phytoplankton Adelie Penguin Blue Whale Killer Whale Zooplankton Fish Leopard Seal Krill Food Source(s) Photosynthesis Krill Krill Leopard Seal Phytoplankton Krill & Zooplankton Fish & Adelie Penguin Phytoplankton BOX NUMBER ORGANISM (type answer here) 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 SP21 2. Fill in the names of the trophic levels that match the blue boxes on the food web above. BOX TROPHIC LEVEL (type answer here) BOX A BOX B BOX C BOX D BOX E Part II: Observations and Measurements of an Ecosystem – For this portion of the lab activity you will need to go outside to make observations and measurements of the ecosystem surrounding where you live. • Take a picture of the outdoor area that you will be using for this study. • Plan to spend at least 10 minutes outside. • Safety note: Don’t touch unknown plants or wild animals. • You will need to use some items from your lab kit to complete this section of the lab. You will need to use two conical tubes and two pH test strips (You should have saved two pH test strips when you completed the macromolecules lab). • Answer the questions and fill in the tables below. 1. Insert the picture of your study area below. 2. Describe the landscape features of your study area. 3. Use a weather app to record the following information about your study site at the time that you are observing it. Air temperature Barometric pressure Wind speed Relative humidity 4. Rate the amount of sunshine currently in your study area. Highlight the box that best represents the amount of sunshine. No sunshine Very little sunshine Moderate sunshine Extremely sunny 5. Are there trees blocking the sky in your study area or is the area open? 6. How does the amount of sunlight affect the temperature of your study area? 7. What sounds do you hear in your study area? 8. Is there water in your study area? If yes, describe the water. SP21 9. If there is water in your study area – carefully collect a small sample of water in one of the conical tubes from your lab kit. Use one pH test strip from your lab kit to test the pH of the water. Write the color of the pH test strip and the corresponding number for the pH below. (If there is no water, then you may skip this question) 10. Describe the ground cover in your study area. (Hint: What is covering the ground?) 11. Carefully collect a small sample of soil in one of the conical tubes from your lab kit. When you return inside, add a small amount of water to the conical tube (tap water is fine). Use one pH test strip from your lab kit to test the pH of the soil. Write the color of the pH test strip and the corresponding number for the pH below. 12. How are the landscape features you have observed (ex. rocks, water, tree cover, etc.) important to the organisms living in your study area? 13. Fill in the table below with all of the different plants and animals you observe in your study area. Plants: List as many different types as possible Animals: List as many different types as possible 14. List at least 2 plant to plant interactions in your study area. (Hint: look for plants that are interacting in some way) • • 15. List at least 2 plant to animal interactions in your study area. (Hint: look for animals and plants interacting together) • • 16. List at least 2 adaptations that plants or animals show in your study area. • • 17. Is there pollution in your study area? If yes, describe the pollution that is present. SP21
Purchase answer to see full attachment