Consider how identifying gaps in practice, along with theory, models, and evidence-based practice can lead to greater wisdom in the data, information, knowledge, and wisdom framework.

Consider how identifying gaps in practice, along with theory, models, and evidence-based practice can lead to greater wisdom in the data, information, knowledge, and wisdom framework.

Consider how identifying gaps in practice, along with theory, models, and evidence-based practice can lead to greater wisdom in the data, information, knowledge, and wisdom framework. 150 150 Nyagu

From Data to Knowledge to Evidence-Based Practice Essay
From Data to Knowledge to Evidence-Based Practice Essay

In this Discussion, consider how identifying gaps in practice, along with theory, models, and evidence-based practice can lead to greater wisdom in the data, information, knowledge, and wisdom framework. To Prepare Review concepts of evidence-based practice in correlation to data collection and knowledge. Consider how this learned knowledge, along with theoretical models, can now be put into nursing practice to create safe and quality healthcare services and information. Post an explanation of how theoretical models and the concepts of data, information, knowledge, and wisdom relate to evidence-based practice in nursing. Be specific and provide examples. From Data to Knowledge to Evidence-Based Practice Essay

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From Data to Knowledge to Evidence-Based Practice

Theoretical models, data concepts, and evidence-based practice all lead to greater wisdom in the data, information, knowledge, and wisdom framework (DIKW). In nursing, the DIKW framework underpins nursing informatics (McBride & Tietze, 2019).Nursing informatics relies on taxonomy and definitions of central data concepts, information, and knowledge. Medical information technology encompasses three aspects that improve our understanding of DIKW; data, information, and knowledge. Data elements constitute information that is then processed into knowledge.

Data, information, knowledge, information systems, and wisdom are all inter-related. Information systems process data to produce information. Here, automated systems, also known as decision support systems, support the decision making process by availing relevant data and information. The inter-relation of these concepts is evidently seen in the decision-making process, which starts with collecting, naming, and organizing data elements. Information produced is interpreted and organized, and processed into knowledge.Further, the expert system utilizes the data obtained to make a decision. The knowledge is interpreted, integrated, and understood, ultimately leading to wisdom. The wisdom is then applied and integrated with service compassion in nursing.From Data to Knowledge to Evidence-Based Practice Essay

A critical example of how data concepts, theoretical models, information, and knowledge are used to advance nursing evidence-based practice is through clinical decision support (CDS). According to Baviso et al. (2016), The Data-Information-Knowledge-Wisdomconceptual framework plays a fundamental role in clinical decision support. It directs the strategic mechanism for meeting the short-term CDS nursing needs while aligning these needs with the overall organizational strategic plan. Clinical decision support provides clinicians with patient-specific data and information intelligently filtered at appropriate times to improve key health outcomes. In nursing, clinical decision support has numerous benefits. Besides improving the quality of care, it prevents medical errors and other adverse events, minimizes healthcare costs, and increases patient and provider satisfaction. CDS is incorporated in electronic health records to enhance evidence-based decision-making while augmenting health organizations’ clinical workflow.

The DIKW framework offers a foundational basis for nursing informatics that, in turn, enables nurses to connect practice with theory. The nursing CDS needs along the DIKW framework are facilitating data capture, meeting information needs, directing knowledge-based decision making, and exposing analytics for wisdom-based clinical interpretations. The first level in the DIKW framework is CDS that facilitates data capture. According to research, data has no meaning in isolation. Meeting information needs is the second level in the framework. CDS performing this function are those that alert health professionals with relevant information relating to a specific patient.

An example is CDS that pertain to patient’s lab values affecting medication administration. The third framework’s level is those that guide knowledge-based decision making. Knowledge is obtained by identifying patterns and relationships that are existing between information types (Matney et al., 2019). This category encompasses any CDS that offer alerts based on the information entered by nurses into the system. A pertinent example is CDS that recommends EBP nursing interventions to operate room nurses.From Data to Knowledge to Evidence-Based Practice Essay

DIKW’s final level is CDS, which exposes analytics for wisdom-based clinical interpretations. The difference between memorizing and understand is what links knowledge and wisdom. Wisdom-based CDS are activated when nurses enter specific patient information by applying their knowledge. Here, nurses leverage their wisdom to determine if a specific evidence-based recommendation is appropriate for particular patients. Overall, clinical decision support categorized as wisdom is critical in improving patient safety and enhancing care quality. The interplay between data, theory, information, and knowledge improves nurses’ understanding of the DIKW framework.From Data to Knowledge to Evidence-Based Practice Essay

References

McBride, S., & Tietze, M. (2019). Nursing informatics for the advanced practice nurse: Patient safety, quality, outcomes, and interprofessionalism (2nd ed.).

Bavuso, K., Bouyer-Ferullo, S., Goldsmith, D., Fairbanks, A., Gesner, E., Lagor, C., Collins, S., & Whalen, K. (2016). Analysis of nursing clinical decision support requests and strategic plan in a large academic health system. Applied Clinical Informatics, 07(02), 227-237. https://doi.org/10.4338/aci-2015-10-ra-0128

Matney, S. A., Staggers, N., & Clark, L. (2016). Nurses’ wisdom in action in the emergency department. Global Qualitative Nursing Research, 3, 233339361665008. https://doi.org/10.1177/2333393616650081

From Data to Knowledge to Evidence-Based Practice Essay