Briefly describe how supportive and interpersonal psychotherapies are similar.

Briefly describe how supportive and interpersonal psychotherapies are similar.

Briefly describe how supportive and interpersonal psychotherapies are similar. 150 150 Nyagu

Supportive Psychotherapy Versus Interpersonal Psychotherapy
Supportive Psychotherapy Versus Interpersonal Psychotherapy

Introduction

Psychotherapy is a treatment approach that targets mental and psychiatric wellbeing. In fact, it involves engaging the professional services of a psychiatrist who applies talk therapy to direct the patient in developing a personalize solution to address the exiting problem. At the conclusion of the therapy, the patient is either considered to be healed having developed healthier habits or approaches to address the problem. In case the patient is not considered treated at the end of the treatment, then other treatment approaches can be recommended (Acton, 2013). The present paper discusses the similarities and differences between supportive psychotherapy (SP) and interpersonal psychotherapy (IP) as aspects of psychotherapy Supportive Psychotherapy Versus Interpersonal Psychotherapy.

Discussion

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Part 1.

There are similarities between SP and IP. Firstly, they apply talk therapy to engage patients in identifying and discussing the existing problem, before developing personalized solutions. Secondly, they require active participation of the patients who must be willing to be treated after noting the presence of the problem, as seen in the requirement that patients be honest in their expression. Finally, the patients must be willing to apply the developed solution and offer feedback that allows for the initial solution to be evaluated and revised as the actual situation demands. Overall, there is a need for the patient to actively participate in the treatment when using either one of the two therapies (Wheeler, 2014). Supportive Psychotherapy Versus Interpersonal Psychotherapy.

Part 2.

Even though SP and IP have three similarities, the two are distinctive therapeutic approaches with three differences. The first difference is the role of the therapist in the treatment process. SP requires that the therapist take on an active role in directing the patient on how to address the existing problem. This implies that the patient takes on a passive role in developing the solution, and an active role in applying the solution as presented. In contrast, IP requires that the patient take on an active role in developing the solution, with the therapist taking on a passive role in helping the patient to identify the problem and solution. The second difference is that SP confines the therapeutic relationship between the therapist and patient within the treatment sessions Supportive Psychotherapy Versus Interpersonal Psychotherapy. In contrast, IP requires that the therapeutic relationship exceed the confines of scheduled therapy sessions with the therapist capable of intervening when called upon irrespective of the time and place. The final difference is that SP has the therapist acting as a model of the ideal while IP has the therapist acting as a guide who helps the client in interpreting what constitutes the ideal (Wheeler, 2014).

Part 3.

As a therapist, I would prefer using IP as opposed to SP. That is because IP is a comprehensive treatment approach that allows the patient to apply a personalized treatment. This is preferable to SP that has the therapist develop a solution that is not guaranteed to work. By incorporating the patient’s perspective, IP ensures that the solution is personalized. In addition, IP does not restrict treatment to the therapy sessions so that the therapist is always available to address the patient’s needs irrespective of place or time. This ensures that the patient receives help from the therapist when required (Cautin & Lilienfeld, 2015). Supportive Psychotherapy Versus Interpersonal Psychotherapy.

Conclusion

One must accept that psychotherapy is a tool for addressing mental needs. In addition, one must acknowledge that there are different psychotherapy approaches to include SP and IP. Although the two are psychotherapy approaches, they share similarities and differences that limit the situations in which they can be used.

References

Acton, A. (2013). Major depressive disorders: new insights for the healthcare professional. Atlanta, GA: Scholarly Editions.

Cautin, R. & Lilienfeld, S. (2015). The encyclopedia of clinical psychology, volume II Cli-E. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons. Supportive Psychotherapy Versus Interpersonal Psychotherapy

Wheeler, K. (Eds.). (2014). Psychotherapy for the advanced practice psychiatric nurse: A how-to guide for evidence-based practice (2nd ed.). New York, NY: Springer Publishing Company.

Assignment 1: Supportive Psychotherapy Versus Interpersonal Psychotherapy
Although supportive psychotherapy and interpersonal psychotherapy share some similarities, these therapeutic approaches have many differences. When assessing clients and selecting therapies, it is important to recognize these differences and how they may impact your clients. For this Assignment, as you compare supportive and interpersonal psychotherapy, consider which therapeutic approach you might use with your clients. Supportive Psychotherapy Versus Interpersonal Psychotherapy.

Learning Objectives
Students will:

Compare supportive psychotherapy and interpersonal psychotherapy
Recommend therapeutic approaches for clients presenting for psychotherapy

To prepare:

Review the media in this week’s Learning Resources.
Reflect on supportive and interpersonal psychotherapeutic approaches.

The Assignment

In a 1- to 2-page paper, address the following:

Briefly describe how supportive and interpersonal psychotherapies are similar.
Explain at least three differences between these therapies. Include how these differences might impact your practice as a mental health counselor. Supportive Psychotherapy Versus Interpersonal Psychotherapy.
Explain which therapeutic approach you might use with clients and why. Support your approach with evidence-based literature.

Note: The School of Nursing requires that all papers submitted include a title page, introduction, summary, and references. The Sample Paper provided at the Walden Writing Center provides an example of those required elements (available at http://academicguides.waldenu.edu/writingcenter/templates ). All papers submitted must use this formatting. Supportive Psychotherapy Versus Interpersonal Psychotherapy.